Reddish Knob, VA, 3/23/16

All photos are Marshall Faintich

Walt Childs and I went to Reddish Knob to look for Red Crossbills and any other birds that might be along the route. We stopped first at Nazarenne Wetlands, but the water there was very high and only a few birds. As we drove up Briery Branch Road towards the Reddish Knob summit, we heard and saw quite a few Pine Warblers.


Pine Warbler


Pine Warbler


Pine Warbler


Pine Warbler


Pine Warbler


Pine Warbler


Pine Warbler


Pine Warbler


Pine Warbler

We saw several other woodland species, including a pair of Red-breasted Nuthatches. The male appeared to be storing a seed in the bark of a tree. I have seen other species do this, but this is the first time I have seen a nuthatch storing a seed.


Black-capped Chickadee


Golden-crowned Kinglet


Red-breasted Nuthatches


Red-breasted Nuthatch


Red-breasted Nuthatch


Red-breasted Nuthatch


Red-breasted Nuthatch


Red-breasted Nuthatch

When we reached the four-way intersection about 1/4 mile from the summit, we stopped to look for Red Crossbills. If they were to be seen, this was the most likely spot. Sure enough, two Red Crossbills were perched fairly high up in a tree. The higher one was quite red, and the lower one was more reddish-orange in color.


Red Crossbill


Red Crossbill


Red Crossbill


Red Crossbill


Red Crossbill


Red Crossbill

While we were watching the Red Crossbills, a Red-tailed Hawk flew over. It was being chased by a Common Raven. Even though there were very few leaves on the trees at that elevation, some of the wildflowers were starting to bloom.


Red-tailed Hawk


Wildflowers

We made our way back home with a stop at Leonard's Pond, where we saw a pair of Mallards, a pair of Northern Shovelers, and lots of turtles. Additional stops along the way yielded our third Red-tailed Hawk of the day, five American Kestrels, and a few other species bringing the day trip count to 32 avian species.


Northern Shovelers


Mallards and turtles


Red-tailed Hawk


Red-tailed Hawk


American Kestrel


American Kestrel



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