Central Virginia, 6/13/16

All photos are Marshall Faintich

Before I get to today's report, I want to post a couple of photos that I took two days ago in my back yard. We have Red-shouldered Hawks that nest each year in or near our house in Stoney Creek (Wintergreen). Although I haven't located the nest yet this year, Red-shouldered Hawks are flying overhead almost every day, and lately, they have been making a lot of noise. One of the juveniles appeared for a few minutes out in the open when I had my camera ready.


Red-shouldered Hawk


Red-shouldered Hawk

Albemarle County; 6/13/16

There was a report yesterday of a White-rumped Sandpiper at Greenfield Farm, and Walt Childs and I took advantage of the cooler and drier morning to go there to look for it. We didn't see the sandpiper, but did see about 10 avian species there, including one warbler species: Common Yellowthroat.


Horned Lark


Killdeer

We were close to Warren Ferry, so we went there to look for Prothonotary Warblers and other species. We found two of them right away, and heard Yellow-throated Warblers high up in the sycamore trees. We also had Red-eyed and Warbling Vireos there, and would have stayed longer, but a truckload of canoers showed up in a large pink bus, and there "went the neighborhood," and we left with 28 avian species on our day list.


Prothonotary Warbler


Prothonotary Warbler


Prothonotary Warbler


Prothonotary Warbler


Prothonotary Warbler


Red-eyed Vireo


Warbling Vireo

Louisa County; 6/13/16

We decided to drive to the Jack Jouet Road and Brackett Farm area in Louisa County. After seeing a few new species, I made a wrong turn on our way to the back entrance to Brackett Farm. I wanted to turn around, but Walt suggested that we explore some roads that neither of us been on before.


Eastern Wood-Pewee

After driving a few miles, we turned onto Valentines Mill Road to look for a way back to Brackett Farm, but we never made it there. There were too many birds to see on Valentines Mill Road. We saw seven or eight, and possibly more, Prairie Warblers, and they were not afraid to fly to within a few feet of us.


Prairie Warbler


Prairie Warbler


Prairie Warbler


Prairie Warbler


Prairie Warbler


Prairie Warbler


Prairie Warbler


Prairie Warbler


Prairie Warbler


Prairie Warbler


Prairie Warbler

We saw a few White-eyed Vireos and Common Yellowthroats.


White-eyed Vireo


White-eyed Vireo


White-eyed Vireo


Common Yellowthroat

By the time we made it to Route 22, we had 40 avian species for the day, and it was time to head for home.


Blue-gray Gnatcatcher


Indigo Bunting



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